L’Apogee Lambskin Bareback Pad

Here is something neat I found! Last weekend at the Rolex I came across a bareback pad I wanted to curl up and go to sleep on.

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This is the “L’Apogee Lambskin Bareback Saddle.” It is made in Austria, with lamb wool that is the thickest, softest, and deepest I’ve seen on a bareback pad. I imagine it would be great for kids with sensory issues and sensitive skin. The billets attach to the flaps, and hang down in the same area as a regular saddle. I like this because I find that most bareback pads use a narrow strap that puts pressure over the horse’s withers/back that causes them to slip back, so I imagine this alternative would work nicely. There are also rings for stirrup leathers to attach to. Although it’s called a bareback saddle, I think it’s more of a bareback pad with a foam rise in the back that acts as a cantle.

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The salesman told me that a few therapeutic riding centers have used this saddle. He showed me this picture of one center that adapted it to have a handle. He said the kids love the feel of the wool. Although the bareback pad is expensive ($500) he said they often make discounts for therapeutic riding centers ($450).

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Now, I’m not getting paid to post this, and I haven’t tested this bareback pad out in lessons, I’m just sharing something neat that I found and would buy for myself if I could!

Has anyone else seen this pad? What types of bareback pads do you use with your riders?

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Note: This is not professional advice, this is a blog. I am not liable for what you do with or how you use this information. The activities explained in this blog may not be fit for every rider, riding instructor, or riding center depending on their current condition and resources. Use your best personal judgment!

7 thoughts on “L’Apogee Lambskin Bareback Pad

  1. We use a combination of no-name Western-style bareback pads, with 1.5in fleece on the bottom of a woven navajo-style blanket and the Best Friend Bareback pads.

  2. Thanks for posting this. Did it look like the pad went up in front to support wither room? So many pads are straight across which is so hard on the withers. Thanks!

    • From what I remember, the front did not go up very much to support wither room, but I did not see it on a real horse, so I can’t say for sure. But the billet straps attached to the panels, instead of a straight strap over the withers, so the material over the withers may be more free to stretch.

  3. We got 2 similar ones. I only experienced that they can be quite slippery, tend to slip to the side. They are not really suitable for big/tall kids or that have a tendency to sit to one side. Also, when you have a horse with a ‘barrel’ shaped back and /or slippery coat the pads are very unstable, even with a normal numnah underneath.
    For small kids and a suitable horse they can be really good.

    • This is a good point. Later when I looked up reviews for this bareback pad the main complain was that is slipped, and therefore should only be used for more balanced riders.

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