Male vs Female Saddle Fit for EAAT

I’m excited to share with you what I’ve learned recently about male vs. female saddle fit and how it might affect instructing adaptive and therapeutic horseback riding lessons! Last week I tried to attend the CHA’s virtual annual conference – I say tried because I had the kids and really only got two sessions in, … Continue reading

A Modified Independent Mount

Quite a few years ago I saw a therapeutic riding student do this modified independent mount and thought it was very clever. I recently found the graphic I drew of it and wanted to share! If I remember correctly, this particular rider had a disability that weakened the muscles in her back and legs, so … Continue reading

Methods of Record Keeping for EAAT

So far in this series on Record Keeping we have discussed Progress Notes, Assessments, and Data Tracking, focusing on what each of those are and their content, or what we record, for each. In this post I will focus on the method itself, which is the how or the physical way in which the content … Continue reading

Data Tracking

And we’re back to the record keeping series! Welcome to Part 4, a post is all about data tracking for therapeutic and adaptive horseback riding programs. Again, I feel like I know so little, but what I’ve learned from the instructor’s perspective is more than enough to share, so this is my best attempt. Enjoy! … Continue reading

Breathing Exercises for Anxious Riders

Today’s post was inspired by a reader who emailed me asking for ideas about breathing exercises for anxious riders in an adaptive or therapeutic riding program. She has a writer who “has developed extreme anxiety, seemingly out of nowhere (even other service providers have noticed and can’t determine why), and we’d like to have a … Continue reading

Working With Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD)

Today we have a type of guest post by Elizabeth Curry, a mom to 12, horse owner, and volunteer at HorsePower TR. She wrote an article for HorsePower TR about working with Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD), and has kindly agreed to share it with us! She originally posted the article on her own blog Ordinary … Continue reading